How to's

Drilling Precisely Centered Holes in Wood

Posted by David Pickard on

Brad-point drill bits are the best drill bits for drilling accurately centered holes in woods. This is because it has a fine center point on the bit so it can be aligned on the exact point you want to drill your holes. V-point drill bits on the other hand commonly have a wide angle at the top of the tip (usually 118° or 135°) which makes it hard to align and stay on the center of your drill point. Also, V-point drill bits are more likely to wander while drilling. However, there is a technique in marking and drilling accurately...

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Space-Saving DIY Clamp Rack

Posted by David Pickard on

Build a space-saving DIY clamp rack which is convenient and easily to use.  The wood is poplar because of its straight grain resulting in very little warpage.  The clamps are pipe clamps but other similar type clamps could be used.  The tracks the clamps sit in are 3 boards glued and screwed together to form a "U".  You could cut the track in a piece of wood thicker than 3/4 inches using a dado blade or shaper cutter, also. This rack holds 10 clamps spaced 7 inches apart.  It folds against the wall when the bottom supports are folded in....

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Easy-to-Make Treatment for Your Wooden Cutting Boards & Utensils

Posted by David Pickard on

Here is an easy recipe to keep your cutting boards and wooden utensils in tip top shape.  All you need is mineral oil and beeswax.  Mineral oil can be purchased in the pharmacy section of your store.  Beeswax, although a little harder to come by, can be purchased on the Internet or at a specialty bee keeping store if you have one in your area.  Farm and ranch stores or other specialty stores might carry beeswax as well.  The granular beeswax is best because it melts faster but solid pieces of beeswax will work.  Beeswax is generally yellow or white....

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Add Beading to Any Board

Posted by David Pickard on

Beadboard is generally available only in certain stock sizes. The sizes fit most any application, but when you have a custom woodworking project, sometimes the stock sizes just don't fit right. What can you do when you run into this problem? The solution is pretty simple actually. This simple technique let's you turn any board into an antique looking beadboard. All you need is a 3/16 X 3/16 router bit, a point-cutting router bit, or a dado blade on your table saw, and a 3/16" dowel strip. Typical beadboard beading is 3 inches from the center of one bead to...

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Adding a Soft Closing Feature to Your Router Table Top

Posted by David Pickard on

DIY Inexpensive Router Lift American Woodworkers shared some plans a while back on how to make your own router lift for your router table. The plans they shared were great and the router lift worked out perfect. But early on in our use of the new lift, we realized that there is a potential hazard of having the top of the router table tip and slam down on you while you're changing the router bit, cleaning up sawdust, making adjustments, etc. Router Lift Missing One Critical Element To solve this problem, another subscriber suggested an inexpensive way to prop up...

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